Webinar Replay:
5 Considerations for Equity Income Investors

Categories Author: Ehren Stanhope, Income, Investing, Yield

Ehren Stanhope photoGenerating income in client portfolios has always been tough.1 And — prospects for rising rates notwithstanding — it will likely be a challenge for years to come. Ehren Stanhope, CFA (OSAM Principal and Client Portfolio Manager) shares his expertise in global dividend-paying stocks, following up on his Dec-2016 postContinue reading “Webinar Replay:
5 Considerations for Equity Income Investors”

3 More Considerations for Equity Income Investors

Categories Author: Ehren Stanhope, Income, Investing

In Part 1, I discussed the massive flows to dividend-paying stocks in recent years, dividend yield’s poor performance1 as an investment factor, and notes of caution for the upcoming rising rate environment. Here are 3 additional considerations and suggestions that address the vehicles most commonly used to access the dividend theme, the popularity of dividend growth, and the importance of valuation in making dividend investments. Continue reading “3 More Considerations for Equity Income Investors”

Equity Income — 2 (of 5) Key Considerations for Investors

Categories Author: Ehren Stanhope, Income, Investing

Here I’ll cover the first 2 of the 5 key considerations for equity income investors, and 3 more in Part 2.

At a time when demand for income generating assets is at an all-time high, the yields on income generating assets are at, or near, all-time lows. While the headlines often speak to the number of Baby Boomers entering retirement, the more important statistic is actually the amount of wealth entering retirement. Continue reading “Equity Income — 2 (of 5) Key Considerations for Investors”

Fundamental Relationships have Changed in QE’s Wake

Categories Author: Ehren Stanhope, Investing, U.S., Value, Yield

“When the facts change, I change my mind. What do you do, sir?”

— Attributed to John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946)

I read a lot of market commentary. There are a lot of doomsayers out there. While I can’t argue with the fact that valuations are higher than they were at the market lows in 2009, the calls for a calamitous decline based on valuation seem overblown. Valuation tends not to be a good predictor of bear markets. Continue reading “Fundamental Relationships have Changed in QE’s Wake”